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This Bridge Called Cyberspace

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    volume 16 number 1 (Fall 2016)
    Author:   Sarah Ortegon
    Title:  Artist Statement: Four Directions
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 10 - 14
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    Authors:   Gloria H Cuádraz and C. Alejandra Elenes
    Title:  Editors' Commentary: We Are All "Under one Moon"
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 20 - 27
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    Author:   Marisa Elena Duarte
    Title:  Uneven Exchanges: Borderlands Violence and the Search for Peace at Sand Creek
    Abstract:   Woven into the social fabric of everyday life, borderlands violence is a perilous accumulation of fault-finding and Othering that, in the US, has rendered Indigenous women, children, and elders the most vulnerable subjects of state-sanctioned allowable violence. When the Northwestern University and Denver University committees released their reports on John Evans's culpability in the 1864 massacre of an entire peace-seeking community of Cheyenne and Arapaho families, perhaps many of us were hoping for a shred of a confession. Instead what we are left with is the story of an overwhelmed businessman, a self-aggrandizing military killer, a frigid Colorado winter, and scores of reopened wounds as we realize we lack the epistemic capacity to contain all of the stories of those who died there, those who killed there, those who survived, and those who profited from this massacre in distinctive and inexplicable ways. As Indigenous feminists, one of our weapons in the war against forgetting is the practice of subversive lucidity, in which we restore epistemic justice by sifting through the record of violence and resiliency to find the threads to weave a healthier future for our women and children.
    Pages: 30 - 53
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    Author:   Jillian Báez
    Title:  Voicing Citizenship: Undocumented Women and Social Media
    Abstract:   This essay explores how voice is mediated by social media through case studies of two highly visible undocumented women in the immigrant rights movement. Through a rhetorical analysis of the Facebook pages and blogs of the case studies, the essay documents the possibilities and constraints of deploying marginalized voices on social media. Ultimately, I argue that social media, as interactive and accessible platforms, enable these women to voice claims to citizenship in more nuanced and unconventional ways than in traditional media outlets. In particular, social media make it possible for these women to use multiple, and sometimes contradictory, voices that challenge conventional notions of citizenship and function as an addendum to more limited messages in traditional media outlets and demonstrations.
    Pages: 56 - 83
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    Author:   Ariana Vigil
    Title:  Heterosexualization and the State: The Poetry of Gloria Anzaldúa
    Abstract:   This paper examines how several poems by the late Gloria Anzaldúa offer a compelling portrait of the role of sexuality in relationship to colonialism, neocolonialism, and state formation. Through a reading of “We Call Them Greasers,” “Cervicide,” and “Yo no fuí, fue Teté,” the essay argues that Anzaldúa pinpoints how heterosexualization and heterosexism have been violently imposed on the bodies and psyches of Chicanas and Chicanos in the service of Anglo and patriarchal social, political, and economic hegemony. Considering these works in relationship to contemporary Chicana and Latina feminist theory, I demonstrate that Anzaldúa’s poetry, an under-studied aspect of her work and thought, takes up questions of gender, violence, and sexuality from a perspective that connects processes of racialized heterosexualization from the Conquest to our present moment.
    Pages: 86 - 109
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    Author:   Lorena Muñoz
    Title:  Latina Immigrant Vendors' Mestiza Consciousness
    Abstract:   This paper is based on the stories of queer Latina immigrant street vendors, collected from 2004 through 2014, for my study on the production of Latinx Immigrant street vending landscapes in Los Angeles. I analytically entangle Bar Tasco [a Latinx immigrant gay bar in Los Angeles] in relation to the oral histories of Gisela and Yolanda—two queer Latina vendors in my study. I build on Anzaldúa's (1987) framework of mestizo consciousness by elucidating how the vendor's space and place are entangled with the collisions of social worlds, which crash in violent ways and produce new ways of adapting, producing and knowing/understanding the world we live in. Anzaldúa reads the collisions of social worlds as possibilities of agency and awareness of multiple oppressions that can be converted towards mestiza consciousness. By extrapolating the material and nonmaterial processes that temporally collide between bodies, ideologies, emotions and state forces, I analyze how Latina immigrant street vendors’ bodies are in constant collisions with social worlds that often produce wounds, pain and ruptures from habitus.
    Pages: 110 - 132
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    Author:   Patricia Trujillo
    Title:  Editor's Commentary: Words to Heal
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 136 - 138
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    Author:   Yolanda Nieves
    Title:  Handkerchief De Algodón
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 140 - 141
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    Author:   Yolanda Nieves
    Title:  Sojourner
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 142 - 143
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    Author:   Yolanda Nieves
    Title:  Sueño Is Reality
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 144 - 146
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    Author:   Isabel Kathryn Ball
    Title:  Where the Metal Meets My Hand
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 148 - 157
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    Author:   Anita Rodriguez
    Title:  The Last Story
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 158 - 161
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    Author:   Lydia A Saravia
    Title:  Mi Tía: Stories of a Murdered Scholar in Guademala
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 162 - 168
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    Author:   Cordelia E Barrera
    Title:  Book Review: Barrio Dreams: Selected Plays by Silviana Wood
    Abstract:   Barrio Dreams: Selected Plays by Silviana Wood. Eds. Norma E. Cantú and Rita E. Urquijo-Ruiz. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2016. Pp. 362. $ 24.95 (paper).
    Pages: 172 - 174
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    Author:   Elisa Facio
    Title:  Book Review: Family Activism: Immigrant Struggles and the Politics of Noncitizenship
    Abstract:   Family Activism: Immigrant Struggles and the Politics of Noncitizenship. By Amalia Pallares. New Brunswick, New Jersey, and London: Rutgers University Press, 2015. Pp. 192. $27.95 (paper, Web PDF, or EBook).
    Pages: 176 - 178
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