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    volume 7 number 2 (Spring 2008)
    Authors:   Tiffany A López and Karen M Davalos
    Title:  Mid-Career Survey: Editors' Commentary
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 8 - 16
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    Author:   Carmelita "Rosie" Castañeda
    Title:  Ni De Aquí, Ni de Allá
    Abstract:   In this autobiographical essay, I explore how my four socially marginalizing subject positions have complicated social integration in my professional life. I use the term distancers to identify these modes of being and doing. To date, my distancers of gender, race, and sexual orientation have been publicly known. Now I make public my fourth distancer, that of disability. I discuss all four distancers in the context of social oppression and set forth the means by which I navigated the academic terrain toward a career in the professorate. The immediate goal of this essay is to lend voice to the marginalizing circumstances lived by those of us with multiple distancers who forge a career in the academy. Faculty with multiple distancers are acutely vulnerable because of our dispersal among predominantly mainstream institutions (PMIs). This article is offered as a proposal to promote radical transformation within the academy by formulating what can be done at the macro/institutional level by staff and at the micro/personal level by faculty with multiple distancers to gain meaningful inclusivity for such faculty at PMIs. [Key words: higher education, multiple social identities, the academy, disability, gender and sexuality, race, social oppression]
    Pages: 20 - 48
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    Author:   Natalia Crespo
    Title:  Romper El Silencio (Para Joyce Tolliver)
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 50 - 53
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    Author:   Marivel Danielson
    Title:  The Birdy and the Bees: Queer Chicana Girlhood in Carla Trujillo's What Night Brings
    Abstract:   Carla Trujillo's first novel, What Night Brings (2003), introduces a wise eleven-year-old Chicana who navigates daily encounters with parental abuse, powerlessness, and increasing confusion about the dynamics of her own nascent sexual subjectivity. Isolated from any semblance of queer community, Trujillo's protagonist fashions her own gendered, sexual, and racialized subjectivity out of the traces of non-normativity or "queer-ness" she finds along her journey. The novel's protagonist employs survival strategies that put flesh onto Emma Pérez's "sitio y lengua" framework (1991), as the child constructs both a space and a language in which to speak her uniquely queer Chicana self. Negotiating intersectionalities of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and spirituality, I introduce the concepts of "familiar alterity" and the juxtaposition of creative versus reactive subversion to help inform my discussion of the young protagonist's platform of resistance and her disruption of largely homophobic and misogynist centers of power in her home and community. [Key words: Chicana, queer, Carla Trujillo, gender, sexuality, Emma Pérez, sitio y lengua, lesbian]
    Pages: 56 - 95
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    Author:   Lorena Duarte
    Title:  Flint Tongue
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 101 - 105
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    Author:   Lorena Duarte
    Title:  My M
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 106 - 108
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    Author:   Margo Tamez (Lipan Apache/ Jumano Apache
    Title:  Space, Position, and Imperialism in South Texas (Dr. Eloisa García Tamez v. U.S. Secretary Michael Chertoff, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 112 - 121
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    Author:   Reid Gómez
    Title:  Introducing California Wasn't Good For Us: A Novel
    Abstract:   The following story has been excerpted from a longer chapter, "Grandma's Hands," from Reid Gómez' forthcoming novel California Wasn't Good for Us. In her words, Gómez describes this work as "an urban Navajo story, a tingling maiden story, a story about the violence we turn in on ourselves in response to racism and Catholicism. Madness, alcoholism, greed, and violence destroy the Calabases. This is the story of the one survivor, Cebolla."
    Pages: 122 - 137
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    Author:   Angharad N Valdivia
    Title:  ¿Qué Onda?
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 140 - 144
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    Authors:   Aída Hurtado and Janelle M Silva
    Title:  The Road Less Traveled: The Erotic Journeys of Mexican Immigrants
    Abstract:   none available
    Pages: 146 - 150
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